Tag Archives: Baby Toes

19 Jun

Unusual Succulent Plant for Miniature Gardens: Fenestraria

Fenestraria is a small genus of miniature succulent plants that can be grown indoor or outdoor as small ornamental plants. These tiny plants are characterized by clumps of small, soft and succulent leaves. Fenestraria comes from arid regions of Namibia and South Africa where they grow and hide themselves in sandy soil in order to retain maximum water in their leaves protect them from harsh sunlight. When grown as houseplants, they tend to produce large clumps of fleshy and soft leaves that look like pebbles or tiny toes, that is why, they are commonly described as Baby Toes plants.

Fenestraria

Fenestraria rhopalophylla (Baby Toes), Image from wikipedia.

Fenestraria or Baby Toes are excellent choice for miniature gardens or as miniature indoor plants. They can be grown in containers as low-maintenance plants. Either grown indoor or outdoor, Fenestraria loves bright but filtered sunlight in summer and protection from winter frost. The plant requires sandy and well-drained soil with regular dose of general fertilizer. Water only when the soil is completely dry because these plants cannot survive wet conditions.

Fenestraria or Baby Toes plant produces white or yellow flowers in winter. Commercially available species are:

Fenestraria aurantiaca: Grows as dwarf (50 mm) succulent plant and produces grey-green leaves and yellow flowers.

F. rhophalophylla: Miniature succulent with white flowers and grey-green leaves; grows up to 40 mm.

 

Though a little tricky, Fenestraria can be grown from seeds.

15 Jun

5 Unusual Plants for a Miniature Succulent Garden

I am a big fan of miniature gardens. They allow you a lot of freedom in a very limited space to grow your gardens the way you want – Japanese tea garden, a traditional Italian garden, a mini succulent garden or whatever creative or unusual you can imagine. Being a lover of cacti and succulents, I have compiled a list of unusual plants that I am going to use in my next miniature succulent garden experiment.

These plants are unusual as well as slow growing, so they can live together for quite a long time.

Epithelantha Micromeris (Button Cactus)

Epithelantha is a really slow growing, miniature succulent.  It grows in rocky and well drained soil, requires very little amount of water and usually remains solitary. The plant bears white or pink flowers in summer. Epithelantha requires a sunny spot to grow but does not like direct harsh sunlight. It is also known as Ping Pong cacti for its unusual formation and resemblance with the Ping Pong ball.

epithelantha micromeris

Epithelantha Micromeris (Button Cactus), Image from www.drogen.bz

Lithops (Living Stones)

You would hardly find these unusual plants visible in their habitat because of their unusual formation and colors that make them look like pebbles. These miniature plants of South Africa are an excellent choice for a miniature garden. These are relatively easy to grow when provided with proper sunlight, regular fertilizer and grown in well drained soil. Lithops bear white and yellow flowers that look like dandelion flowers.

Lithops, Living Stones

Lithops (Living Stones), Image from lithops.net

Fenestraria (Baby Toes)

Another group of miniature and unusual succulents, Fenestraria belong to extremely dry regions of South Africa where they rely on rainfall for survival and hide themselves in sand for protection against harsh climate. They are excellent choice for a miniature succulent garden and form a soft, green mat of succulent leaves. This unusual plant bears white and yellow flowers in winter. Fenestraria is also known as Baby Toes plants.

Fenestraria Rhopalophylla, Baby Toes

Fenestraria Rhopalophylla (Baby Toes), Image from wikipedia.org

Crassula

Almost all species in this group are suitable for a miniature succulent garden. These attractive plants are known for their colorful foliage and unusual, tiny flowers. These are drought tolerant plants and do not require plenty of water. These unusual succulents need protection against direct/harsh sunlight and frost. The most unusual of all Crassula is Crassula ‘Buddha’s Temple’ which is a hybrid of Crassula Pyramidalis and Crassula Perfoliata var. minor. This unusual plant actually looks like a mini pagoda.

Crassula (Buddha's Temple)

Crassula (Buddha's Temple), Image from ilgiardinosullago.blogspot.com

Discocactus Horstii

Another unusual, lovely and rare succulent plant that belongs to Brazil, Discocactus Horstii is known for its unusual white flowers that bloom in the night and spread intoxicating fragrance. This unusual plant grows solitary and forms a nice and symmetrical globose body. Mature plants produce woolly cephalium covered by bristles. This plant is sensitive to frost, requires partial sunlight and moderate watering.

Discocactus Horstii

Discocactus Horstii, Image from www.discocactus.nl